How to Trick Yourself Into Being a Morning Person

How to become a morning person / www.CandidlyKelseyBlog.com

I have mixed feelings about mornings. The physical act of waking up is damaging to my soul, but mornings generally = coffee so you can see my problem here. What I do not have mixed feelings about is being a morning person. I go back and forth on loving/hating mornings, but have landed on forcing myself into being a morning person makes the whole thing a lot easier.

But Kelsey, how in the world do I possibly become a morning person? Oh my gosh, thanks for asking. I happen to have quite a few tips and tricks for area. After several years of working the opening shift at gyms (hello, 4:30am alarm clocks!) I feel as if I have mastered the morning routine. And lucky for you, I am going to share them today:

  1. Give yourself something to look forward to. Other than the fear of being fired, the only thing that gets me out of bed in the morning is the promise of my coffee. I prep everything the evening before so the first thing I do when my alarm goes off is head towards my coffee. I take a drink before I even go to the bathroom.
  2. Remove all roadblocks. I prep everything the night before: outfit, lunch and breakfast in my lunchbox,  and having my purse and keys ready to go. Doing this in the evening massively cuts down on how much you need to think in the morning– and gives you more time!
  3. Make your commute fun. I use my 45 minute bus ride to listen to podcasts, read, and look at fun things on Pinterest all while drinking my long awaited iced coffee (this post is not sponsored by coffee, I swear). The commute sucks but is also a good way to relax before you get work.
  4. Keep your home tidy. This is a bigger one, but oh so important. Imagine waking up to a messy kitchen, bathroom or bedroom and trying to wade through it all when your brain is most vulnerable. Take 10 minutes before you go to bed to tidy up and save your morning mood. And I don’t mean mop your floors and dust the bookshelves, I just mean putting your clothes in the hamper, clearing off your sinks and counter tops, and having the room look generally put together.
  5. Look cute. This one might be controversial but I swear it helps. There is a reason why people who work from home also say that getting dressed and ready for the day makes a big difference. Build a few moments into your morning to style your hair, put on some make-up, and make yourself feel put together. If you still feel like you’ve rolled out of bed then chances are you will feel like you still are in bed. So put on some mascara and feel the difference this makes.

If all else fails, you can try bonus #6: Dunk your head in ice water! It probably works just as well as thinking ahead and planning for your days. You might not have such a smooth day afterwards but it’ll wake you up, that’s for sure.

Do you have any morning tips? Are you already a morning person and I sound like I’m speaking Spanish? Let me know, and share those tips in the comments.

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Stitchin’ Mad

"A woman's place is in the revolution" cross stitch, pattern from Pinterest, stitched by Candidly Kelsey / www.CandidlyKelseyBlog.comOops I have another new crafting hobby. How shocked are you? Probably not at all. And if you follow me on Instagram then you know exactly what my new hobby is: I’ve learned to cross stitch!

My creative skill arsenal includes knitting, crocheting, very mediocre hand lettering and painting, and gluing sh*t to other sh*t, usually with glitter.  Obviously because that’s not enough, I decided I need to add cross stitch to the mix. And now we can add this to the list of reasons that I am really a middle-aged woman living in a 25-year old’s body.

This all started innocently enough. I was growing bored of knitting (or, really, how expensive knitting is) and wanting something else I could do while I sat on the couch each night. Plus, who can resist cross stitch patterns with potty-mouth language and a whole lotta sass?

Hint: not me.

So I bought a premade kit online and had some fun. I sent oodles of pictures to my friends as I went, as if I was the first ever to make tiny Xs on fabric. I was Cross Stitch Queen, hear me roar. Everyone needed to look at my tiny Xs and how they made shapes and words. I was Picasso but with both ears.

But that wasn’t enough. I needed to do more. When I start something new I have to throw myself into it. In the words of Jenna Marbles, I have the “Too Much” gene. And, having found no other kits that really that tickled my fancy I started creating my own patterns. It’s been really fun, and I’d never realized how much fun coloring in tiny boxes to make one giant picture was. It’s like using an Excel document but not awful! Now these are MY tiny Xs.

"YAAAS QUEEN" cross stitch original pattern by Candidly Kelsey / www.CandidlyKelseyBlog.com

(Psst, special thing just for YOU reading this: I just added my YAAAS QUEEN pattern as my first Etsy listing– I haven’t even officially announced my shop yet! Be the first to get it here!)

"Relax, we're all gonna die anyway" cross stitch original pattern by Candidly Kelsey / www.CandidlyKelseyBlog.com

And then creating my own pattern escalated. Suddenly I have a box full of aida cloth in different stitch counts, and I am in 12 different cross stitch Facebook groups. I really don’t know how this happens. I just blinked and now my coffee table is covered in DMC Embroidery Floss and tiny needles. My couch has tiny stray floss pieces all over it. I pulled yellow floss out of my hair at work last week. It’s a sickness and it’s overtaken me. Send help (except don’t because I’m having a great time.)

Long story short, this is a thing that is now part of me. Kelsey the Crafter lives on (which would have also been a great alternative blog name, if I could also somehow fit “cosmetics” in there too). As today is World Cross Stitch Day, it seemed like a great time to officially come clean about this new thing I do.  I have officially added “cross stitch” into my monthly budget. G*d help us all.

Have you been obsessed with any new hobbies lately? Let me know in the comments.

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How to Contact Your Representative

How to Contact Your Representative / www.CandidlyKelseyBlog.com

Hello, hi, howdy and welcome to my first official political post in which we discuss how to contact your representative. Regardless of what your political opinion is, it is very important to know how to contact your officials. Your voice doesn’t end with voting for your president and it’s important to stay in contact with your officials. But unfortunately, not everyone knows how to talk to them– or even who their representatives are. So let’s change that, huh?

Let’s just start by saying that this is a non-partisan post. I obviously have political opinions (follow me on Twitter and you know exactly what those are) but this post is not for that. The point of this post is to make sure each person is armed with the knowledge of how to stay in contact with their officials, regardless of their ideologies.

How to Contact Your Representative:

  1. Know your elected officials. Your senators and representatives are JUST as important as your president. This website is the official US Gov site on contacting your officials, but (in my opinion) isn’t as user friendly. WhoIsMyRepresentative.com can help you find who your representatives and senators are by searching via zip code or by state. It will also link you to their webpages and contact info.
  2. Learn their stance on issues that are important to you. The internet has tons of great resources to find out more about them and their voting record. VoteSmart.org and OnTheIssues.org are great sites to learn about their stance on important issues and how they’ve voted in the past.
  3. Write them a letter. They represent YOU. Let them know what issues are important to you. If you don’t agree with their record, you can tell them– but be respectful about it. They’re not likely to pay attention to a letter full of expletives. Explaining your points and why you feel that way is a much more valid argument than just telling them they’re wrong. Even if you do agree with their record, tell them, and tell them why. About.com has a great article on tips for writing a letter, and although this other template is about biology, it’s a great example of the format a general template for writing to your representatives. Just take out all the science stuff and replace it with what is specific to you.
  4. Stay updated on what is happening. Whatever happens in congress is public record, and is archived. The best places I found to read about the legislation in the senate on Senate.gov, and the House of Representatives on Clerk.House.gov. The websites aren’t super user-friendly, so take some time to explore them. Each bill has a name, so you can watch pieces of legislation as they are updated. You can follow specific pieces that are important to you and track their progress. And although the news covers them, you can also follow Executive Orders signed by Trump on WhiteHouse.gov and read them for yourself.
  5. Continue to voice your opinion. If something happens that you are happy about then write, email or call your representative’s office. If something happens that you don’t like, do the same. They are YOUR representative. And the only way they can represent you is if they know how you feel.

Bonus: Always, always, always fact-check yourself. Don’t blindly share things that you see online. There is such a thing as “fake news” and it’s unfortunately all over social media pages. A quick Google search to see if something is real will save you from spreading false info. It’ll also keep you from looking dumb, which is nice.

There are tons of other ways to stay updated with what is happening in our government, but this is what works for me.

If you have other ways you like to contact your congressman, or other ways to stay updated on what is happening in congress, please leave them in the comments for others to see. Let’s make it a little easier to make our voices heard.

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8 On-The-Spot Ways to Get Calm

Feeling overwhelmed is awful, especially when you're in a stressful situation. Sometimes you can't always escape, but you can use techniques to help you get calm in the moment... // CandidlyKelseyBlog.com

I’ve talked a lot about anxiety lately– including Things That Happen When You See a Therapist as well as How to Find A Therapist.  To see all of my anxiety posts, you can scroll through my “Mental Health” posts under the “Health” tab at the top. With all this focus on anxiety, we still haven’t really talked too much about how to combat anxiety and get calm.

So when NewLifeOutlook emailed me asking if they could write about some techniques to help you get calm, obviously I agreed. Eric provided some helpful tips on how to calm down when you’re feeling anxious, some of which I utilize myself when I’m feeling stressed. Hopefully these tips help you if you’re in need.

Got any tips of your own, or agree with anything listed below? Leave them at the end in the comments! And without further ado, I’ll kick it over to Eric to talk about how to get calm.

8 On-The-Spot Ways to Get Calm

The ability to relax and calm yourself during a stressful situation is an ability that seems to come naturally to some. They always seem to have a plan and never let worry get the best of them, while you feverishly work to find anything that works for you.

Since you do not have the innate ability to get calm quickly, you must work to build coping skills that break the pattern of stress and tension in order to let in feelings of peacefulness and control.

Here are the eight best on-the-spot relaxation skills to leave you calm.

Deep Breathing

Before you cringe or bemoan the fact that this list includes deep breathing, understand that this is just one of the natural ways to relieve anxiety that works wonders for many people.

When you hear “deep breathing,” you may think about people who have tried to convince you of its powers before, or how you already tried it with no success. The truth is that deep breathing is highly effective, but most people perform it incorrectly.

To begin your mastery, work to take a deep breath in while leaving your shoulders still. Let your stomach protrude as you suck in the air. After a brief pause, let the air escape slowly for a long exhale.

Exercise

Exercise works wonders for many physical and mental health complaints, and as it turns out, it is even effective in calming your body and mind.

You do not even need to lace up your sneakers or go to the gym. If you are feeling tense or restless, try some dynamic stretches to burn off some energy.

Touch your toes or roll your arms forward to reduce some tightness in your chest. Doing jumping jacks or pushups shouldn’t be out of the question either — sure, you may look odd exercising in your work clothes, but it is better than feeling anxious.

Experiment with different types of exercise in different situations to find what works best for you.

Change Your Thinking

All day every day, thoughts are swirling through your head, making you anxious. Take control of your thoughts by inserting some positivity, or challenging whatever messages are contributing to your stress.

Some people develop mantras to improve their thought patterns. Mantras are simple phrases or sentences that you can repeat out loud or to yourself when their influence is needed.

Saying “I feel relaxed, calm, and in control” can work to modify your thoughts and change the resulting behaviors. Whichever version you choose, be sure to say it often to get the desired impact.

Listen to Music

A four-minute song can completely change your point of view, even when you’re stressed or anxious. Keep a positive playlist on your phone so the songs will be there whenever you need them.

Perhaps heavy metal is just what you need to find calm, or maybe you peace in a concerto. The important thing is you find music that reverses — rather than reinforces — your tension.

Again, experimentation will be necessary here. Some tunes will work better in certain situations than others.

Play a Game

Since your phone is already out after listening to music, you might as well open up your favorite app and play a few games.

People generally spend too much time on their phones, which equates to too much wasted time and distraction. In this case, a small amount of escape is acceptable.

Diving into the game will consume all of your attention and provide your brain with a needed break. During this time, you can find enough separation from your stressor to have a new, fresh approach.

Be sure to limit your time, though. There is a thin line between short-term escape and long-term avoidance.

Call a Friend

Your phone can play music and can help you play games as well. Another thing your phone can do is actually make a phone call!

So many people are just a call away, and even though they might not be able to erase your stress, they can be a friendly voice on the other end of the line. Start with people you trust and respect, and feel free to guide the conversation in any direction.

Talking about your anxiety isn’t a must since you can find calm by discussing last night’s game or the show on this evening. Once you hang up, you might find yourself with a new level of relaxation.

Avoid texting; the lack of immediacy can trigger increased anxiety as you wait for a response.

Physical Contact

When you were a child, there was nothing more calming or soothing than being held by your mother. It seems unlikely that your mother can still pick you up and rock you to sleep, but physical contact will assist in your goal of relaxation.

Find a loved one to hug. If no one is available, give yourself a squeeze to replicate the experience. Otherwise, you can find a comforting piece of clothing or a pillow to hug or rub against your face. This physical contact can add feelings of calm and safety no matter where you are.

Have a Taste

Stimulating your senses is a great way to help you get calm. Music and hugs soothe your hearing and touch, while eating or drinking can target your taste and smell.

Having a glass of ice water can be calming. A piece of dark chocolate or your favorite fruit can accomplish the goal with a bit more flavor.

My having something to taste and smell, you begin to focus more on these and less on your tension. Of course, you must be careful to keep this under control — a large milkshake may reduce some stress in the moment but lead to other problems later.

Avoid caffeine and alcohol as well. Three espressos may seem like a good idea, but that much caffeine will only trigger more anxiety.

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Eric Patterson, LPC is a professional counselor in western Pennsylvania working for the last 10 years to help children, teens and adults achieve their goals and live happier lives. You can find more of his writing on NewLifeOutlook.

Feeling overwhelmed is awful, especially when you're in a stressful situation. Sometimes you can't always escape, but you can use techniques to help you get calm in the moment... // CandidlyKelseyBlog.com

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How to Find a Therapist

Finding a therapist or counselor to speak with can be incredibly overwhelming. Let's talk about how to make the process easier // www.CandidlyKelseyBlog.com

At beginning of the month I wrote about the unexpected benefits of therapy. Now, let’s talk now about how to find a therapist. Though the process can seem SUPER overwhelming, don’t get discouraged. It was definitely easier than finding a boyfriend, if that makes anyone feel better!

I took two approaches to find a therapist, but only really found success with the second one. As the first approach was suggested to me by my doctor, I thought I’d include it anyway for good measure.

BUT, before you go a-searchin’, there are some things you need to do:

Decide what are important qualifications for you.  For example, my qualifications were pretty simple. As I don’t have a car, location was a major key for me.  I wanted someone close to where I lived so it didn’t make going to see them that much harder.  I also knew I wanted a woman, someone who specialized in anxiety, and who was relatively young. Another important factor was needing them to be able to work with a sliding pay scale, as the fate of my insurance coverage would be fluctuating in the future.

When looking for someone, here are a few helpful things to keep in mind:

  • Location
  • Specialty/Experience in specific mental ailments (ie: depression, anxiety, sexuality, trauma, etc.)
  • Gender
  • Insurance/pay schedule
  • Age
  • Appointment availability
  • Style or theory of counseling, ie- Are you a big jokester? Do you want someone with a sense of humor? An optimist? Do you want someone to take you very seriously? These types of styles are important, as they’ll affect your comfort level and ability to open up to them.
  • TYPE of therapist– there are many types of counselors, and many different certifications of what we probably all lump together as “psychologists”.  Though most will help with the average talk-therapy, you may want someone who has a different specialty. Don’t hesitate to do a little research if you are unsure of exactly what you are looking for.

Check your insurance.  I checked mine online, but you can also just call your provider and ask about your coverage. Thankfully, my current health insurance covers mental health very well, so that was a huge load off my mind.  If you are without insurance, or don’t have insurance that covers mental health, make sure you take that into account when looking for someone.  I knew that I will be switching jobs in August/September, or possibly even going without a job for a short period of time this fall, so having someone who accepted many insurances, or worked on a sliding pay scale (relative to your income!) if I lost insurance was a huge bonus. Your insurance may have certain restrictions, or not cover mental health care at all, so be sure to know this before looking for people!

Approach #1: Referral from my Primary Care Physician

My general doctor issued me a referral, and gave me a list of therapists that were in-network with my primary care office.  I sorted them by location, then by gender, and started calling places that were recommended.  Honestly, I got a lot of not-so-nice responses from some places, some crazy long wait times for my first appointment, and some really staggering prices for sessions that scared me off immediately.  I think I made about six calls before I gave up and decided the process was hopeless. This was not exactly the most encouraging way to do it, in my opinion.

Plus, making me CALL THEM was not an ideal situation— anyone else out there with anxiety can probably agree with me on that one.

Approach #2: Using Psychology Today.Com

A friend who is in the mental health field suggested I use the “Find A Therapist” feature on  PsychgologyToday.com. Not only could I plug in exactly what my specifications were, like creating a search filter, but it had an EMAIL option. I picked four counselors that met my specifications, and sent them all an email:

Hello, my name is Kelsey and I am looking for a therapist to help with anxiety.  Are you accepting new patients? I have a referral from my primary care physician if you need it, and Cigna health insurance. I’d love to book a preliminary appointment if you have any openings. Thanks!

I received 2 responses from therapists with open availability, and two that were not accepting patients at that time. I booked a free consultation the same week with one, and told the other I would get back to her if I wanted to book an appointment.

Why I Chose My Therapist:

Now that I found someone to talk to, I had to decide if I thought she was the right person for me.

After our 1-hour consultation, I knew I wanted to keep seeing her because I immediately felt very comfortable and welcomed by her. It was a gut-feeling thing more than anything else. She made me feel as relaxed as I possibly could in that situation, but did it without making me feel pressured to feel relaxed.

After two more sessions, I knew I had made the right choice and wanted to keep seeing her. She was very good at taking the lead of a conversation when I needed her too, or letting me control the session when I wanted to. The conversation never lulled, and every single moment felt productive– which was huge to me. It also helped greatly that she laughed at my stupid jokes, which happened a lot because I make bad jokes when I’m uncomfortable.

Finding the right fit will feel different for everyone, so my biggest piece of advice is simple: just go with your gut. If it doesn’t feel right, then try someone else. And there is no shame in telling someone you try out that it doesn’t feel like a good fit– if they are a professional, they will completely understand! It may take time, but it is soooo worth it in the end to have someone you can speak candidly.

Any questions? Do you see a therapist yourself and have other tips to offer about finding one? Put your recommendations in the comments!

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